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Campus Pioneers: The FIrst 25 Years of Women at Gonzaga, 1948 - 1973: Case 5

Case 5: Housing and Residence Life

Case 5: Housing and Residence Life

When women were initially admitted to Gonzaga, they did not have a dormitory to live in and could only attend if they had a family member to stay with in Spokane. Over the years, however, as enrollment grew, the university added dormitories for women. This case shows the changes made to accommodate women students and glimpse into their lives as residents.

Original Crimont Hall, about 1950’s.

Original Crimont Hall, about 1950’s.

When women first arrived on campus in 1948, there was no designated dormitory for them. Women could only attend Gonzaga if they had somewhere to stay within the city of Spokane. Crimont Hall, originally a house owned by the family of Fr. John Dunne, was previously an infirmary but was converted to the first housing for women in 1951.

Modern Crimont Hall, about 1960’s.

Modern Crimont Hall, about 1960’s.

Standing where the original Crimont Hall stood is the modern Crimont Hall. The original house, which was donated by the family of Fr. John Dunne, was demolished and the modern-day Crimont Hall was built in the 1960’s to provide housing for 100 women.

Crimont Club, about 1954.

Crimont Club, about 1954.

Clubs pertaining to each residence hall were common at Gonzaga. Pictured here is the Crimont Club, in front of the original Crimont Hall, which was a house for female residents.

Madonna Hall Construction, about 1953.


Madonna Hall Construction, about 1953.

Nancy Rabdan and her Family on Move-In Day at Madonna Hall, 1954.

Nancy Rabdan and her Family on Move-In Day at Madonna Hall, 1954.

Madonna Hall was built between 1953 and 1954. While at the time it served as a dormitory for 120 female students, today both male and female students reside there.

Mrs. Lavin, 1954.

Mrs. Lavin, 1954.

Mrs. Joseph Lavin, a widow to Joseph Lavin, was the first hall mother of Madonna Hall for women in the 1950’s.

Coed Cues: A Guide to Campus Living at Gonzaga, about 1965.

part 1/2: Coed Cues: A Guide to Campus Living at Gonzaga, about 1965.part 2/2: Coed Cues: A Guide to Campus Living at Gonzaga, about 1965.

“Coed Cues” booklets given to new students at the beginning of each school year. It lists the expectations for how a coed should dress and behave while living on campus at Gonzaga and other university policies.

Women in front of St. Catherine/St. Monica, about 1965.

Women in front of St. Catherine/St. Monica, about 1965.

The halls of St. Catherine and St. Monica were built in the 1963 to help accommodate the rising number of female students.

St. Catherine St. Monica Scrapbook, 1968-1969.

part 1/2: St. Catherine St. Monica Scrapbook, 1968-1969.part 2/2: St. Catherine St. Monica Scrapbook, 1968-1969.

This scrapbook highlights some of the events that occurred throughout the St. Catherine St. Monica halls. Nicknamed “CM,” this dorm was built in 1963 and became well-known its sense of community and constant activity.

Women in St. Catherine/St. Monica Dorm Room, 1964

Women in St. Catherine/St. Monica Dorm Room, 1964

St. Catherine and St. Monica, built to accommodate the growing population of female students, became known for the strong sense of community it had for the students that lived there.