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Campus Pioneers: The FIrst 25 Years of Women at Gonzaga, 1948 - 1973: Case 6

Case 6: Organizations

Case 6: Organizations

Even with the large variety of clubs on campus prior to 1948, women were not welcome in all of them. The creation of Associated Women Students (A.W.S.) helped women to have a voice among the student body and clubs. Initially, the club was created to give co-eds a place for social interaction with other students and to provide a sense of belonging among male students. Drill Team, Glee Club, and Ski Club became popular among female students.

Women’s Glee Club, about 1950.

Women’s Glee Club, about 1950.

Ski Club, 1952-1953.

Ski Club, 1952-1953.

Left to right: G. Van Hoomissen, R. Paulin, Jim Sandmeyer, John Ditter, Anita Phohl, Arline Mehner, Carol Hein, D. Robinson, Tom Gardner.

The ski club was the first club on campus to allow women. The first year that women were admitted to Gonzaga, four competed as a part of the ski club.

Women’s Rifle Club, 1953.

Women’s Rifle Club, 1953.


In 1953, women were able to have a part in Gonzaga’s ROTC program. This photo shows the 1953 ladies Rifle Club practicing their skills.

Women’s Drill team, 1967.

Women’s Drill team, 1967.

In 1963, the Little Lieutenants were organized and participated in drill meets, parades, basketball half-times, and other activities. They were sponsored by the R.O.T.C. and had representation on the A.W.S. council.

Associated Women Students Officers, 1963-1964.

Associated Women Students Officers, 1963-1964.

Right to left: Melly McGreevy, Jane DesMarais, Randy Larango, Kris Kononen, Janet Gubanc, Helen Ferry, Ann Moyer, May, 1964.

Associated Women Students was an important organization for female students at Gonzaga. As the first all-female group to organize on campus, they helped give a voice to female co-eds.

“Co-ed Auxiliary to Knights of the Kennel May Be Formed Next Month,” Bulletin, Dec. 3, 1948.

“Co-ed Auxiliary to Knights of the Kennel May Be Formed Next Month,” Bulletin, Dec. 3, 1948.

Originally called the Zagettes, the Spurs, who worked in conjunction with the Knights of the Kennel, were a symbol of male and female students coming together rather than being at odds with one another.

Zagettes, 1952.

Zagettes, 1952.

Before there were women on campus, the Knights of the Kennel became a prominent, all-male service organization at Gonzaga for sophomores. Not long after female enrollment there was the creation of a female counterpart to the Knights of the Kennel, called the Zagettes, in 1951. However, as soon as they gained approval to join the national Spurs in 1955, their named changed to the Spurs. Creation of the Spurs was important in bridging the gap between male and female students. These two organizations have worked together at Gonzaga for 65 years through acts of service.

"Spurs Scrapbook,” 1964-1965.

"Spurs Scrapbook,” 1964-1965.

For a number of years, the Spurs’ historian was in charge of making a scrapbook to catalog the events that Spurs put on or took part in. This scrapbook is from the 1964-1965 school year and talks about the initiation process for new Spurs. If a girl was selected to join the Spurs, she would be “tapped” in the early hours of the morning and would then partake in activities throughout the day with the other new Spurs.

Spurs, 1972-1973.

part 1/2: Spurs, 1972-1973.part 2/2 (close up): Spurs, 1972-1973.

The Spurs continued to grow as a prominent service organization at Gonzaga. In 1970-71 they dropped their affiliation with the Spurs, but kept the name until becoming known as the Setons in 1989.

Spur Sweater, no date.

 

Spur Sweater, no date.

Spurs were required to wear sweaters with the Spur emblem, front and center, every Wednesday. This sweater was donated by Ginny Trethewey.