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Battles, Balderdash & Beauty: American Popular Sheet Music from the Howard W. Wildin Collection: Others

Sheet music covers

Introduction

Case 8: Others: Introduction

 

This display case is located on Foley Center's main floor near the Reference Desk.  It shows 10 various pieces of sheet music.

Burtnett, Earl. “Evening: Brings Love Dreams of You”. Lyricist: Haven Gillespie. New York: A. J. Stasny Music Co. 1919. (HW-00010R)

Burtnett, Earl. “Evening: Brings Love Dreams of You”. Lyricist: Haven Gillespie. New York: A. J. Stasny Music Co. 1919. (HW-00010R)

 

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Earl Burtnett (1896 – 1936) was an American songwriter and bandleader, who was popular in the 1920s and 1930s.  He was pianist and arranger for the Art Hickman orchestra, becoming the leader following Hickman’s death.  Burtnett died of peritonitis after having an appendectomy at age 39.

Fisher, Fred. "Siam". Lyricist: Howard Johnson. Illus. R.S. New York: Leo. Feist, Inc. 1915. (HW-02723)

Fisher, Fred. "Siam". Lyricist: Howard Johnson. Illus. R.S. New York: Leo. Feist, Inc. 1915. (HW-02723)

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Fred Fisher (1875-1942), German-born American songwriter worked for the publishing firms Harms & Company and Leo Feist & Company and later founded the Fred Fisher Music Publishing Company.  He wrote “Chicago”, “And the Band Played On” and numerous others.  Fisher was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1970.

 

Freeman, Harold B. “I’ll Tell the World: But I Can’t Tell You”. Illus. Leo Sielke. Providence, RI: Harold Freeman Music Company. 1919. (HW-00026R)

Freeman, Harold B. “I’ll Tell the World: But I Can’t Tell You”. Illus. Leo Sielke. Providence, RI: Harold Freeman Music Company. 1919. (HW-00026R)

 

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Cover art shows the famous Canadian born silent actress Mary Pickford (1892-1979).  Known as "America's Sweetheart," she starred in 236 films from 1908 to 1935.  She received an Oscar for Lifetime Achievement in 1976.

 

MacEachron, J. Reginald. “Rose, Sweet Rose”. Illus. Paul de Longpré. Publisher: J. R. MacEachron. 1905. (HW-02719)

MacEachron, J. Reginald. “Rose, Sweet Rose”. Illus. Paul de Longpré. Publisher: J. R. MacEachron. 1905. (HW-02719)

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J. Reginald MacEachron was an American musical composer.  He is known for his rag "On Easy Street" in 1901.  This piece on display is a waltz.

Cover art was done by French flower painter, Paul de Longpre (1855-1911), who worked mainly in the United States.  De Longpre only painted flowers.

 

Shepherd, Adaline. "Pickles and Peppers: A Rag Oddity, March and Two Step". Milwaukee, WI: Joseph Flanner. 1906. (HW-02703)

Shepherd, Adaline. "Pickles and Peppers: A Rag Oddity, March and Two Step". Milwaukee, WI: Joseph Flanner. 1906. (HW-02703)

 

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Born in 1883, Adaline Shepherd began to compose in her early 20’s and published this rag in 1906, which was enormously successful.

Taylor, Raymond. “Signal from Mars: March and Two Step”. Arranger: E. T. Paull. Illus. A. Hoen & Co. New York: E. T. Paull. 1901. (HW-02729)

Taylor, Raymond. “Signal from Mars: March and Two Step”. Arranger: E. T. Paull. Illus. A. Hoen & Co. New York: E. T. Paull. 1901. (HW-02729)

 

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This piano march was arranged by Edward Taylor Paull, who was famous for his descriptive marches.  

 

Work, Henry Clay. “Marching Through Georgia: March & Two-Step”. Arrange. F. W. Meacham. Illus. E. H. Pfeiffer. New York: De Luxe Music Co. 1908. (HW-02649)

Work, Henry Clay. “Marching Through Georgia: March & Two-Step”. Arrange. F. W. Meacham. Illus. E. H. Pfeiffer. New York: De Luxe Music Co. 1908. (HW-02649)

 

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Henry Clay Work (1832-1885) was an American composer who wrote 75 songs.  “Marching through Georgia”, first published in 1865, refers to U.S. Major General William Tecumseh Sherman marching his Union troops through Confederate Georgia to capture Savannah, Georgia the previous year during the American Civil War. The song became popular with Union veterans.  This version has been arranged by F. W. Meacham to be a march played by piano.

Bonacio, Bennie. “Dance of the Pelicans: Piano Novelty”. Illus. Barbelle. New York: Melomusic Publications Inc. 1951. (HW-00005R)

Bonacio, Bennie. “Dance of the Pelicans: Piano Novelty”. Illus. Barbelle. New York: Melomusic Publications Inc. 1951. (HW-00005R)

 

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Notice the cover’s error: image is of penguins not pelicans. 

Bennie Boancio (1903-1974) was an Italian born clarinetist, saxophonist and composer.

 

Loesser, Frank. “Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition!” New York: Famous Music Corporation. 1942. (HW-00054R)

Loesser, Frank. “Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition!” New York: Famous Music Corporation. 1942. (HW-00054R) (Image restricted by copyright laws. Available on 3rd floor, Foley Library)

 

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This American patriotic song was a response to the attack on Pearl Harbor that forced the United States into World War II.  The lyrics describe a chaplain, or “sky pilot” as used in the song, is among men who are under attack.  The chaplain puts down his Bible, goes to one of the ship’s gun turrets, and begins firing saying “Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition”.  The song is loosely based upon a real chaplain who was aboard the USS New Orleans during the Pearl Harbor attack. Instead of manning a gun turret, the chaplain helped the men who were moving ammunition as a form of bucket brigade.  To encourage them he said: “Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition.” (Wikipedia)

Browne, Jerry & DeVol, Frank. “Little Bo-Peep Has Lost Her Jeep”. New York: Peer International Corporation. 1942. (HW-00037R)

Browne, Jerry & DeVol, Frank. “Little Bo-Peep Has Lost Her Jeep”. New York: Peer International Corporation. 1942. (HW-00037R) (Image restricted by copyright laws. Available on 3rd floor, Foley Library)

 

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Spike Jones made this song popular during World War II.  The lyrics tell of Private Jackson, who had a girl he called Bo Peep.  Since he did not have a car he drove a military jeep.  He let her drive and she sped through town and side swiped a police car.  The last line verse: “Now little Bo Peep has lost her jeep / O my, why must her joy end? / Now her little jeep is layin’ in a heap / And the guardhouse has her boyfriend.”