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Patriotism, the Pacific Northwest and the Ku Klux Klan: Contents of Case 2

This guide is a student project of History Department intern, Elizabeth Velonza, Spring Semester 2020

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"Inter-Klan Newsletter & Survival Alert (1983)," Collected Materials on White Nationalism, courtesy of Emily Clark, Ph.D, Gonzaga University

Louis Beam is a veteran and a White Nationalist who worked as the Aryan Nations Ambassador in the 1980s. His speech at the Aryan World Congress in Hayden Lake, Idaho, uses patriotic and violent language when calling for the destruction of the U.S. Government. He specifically mentions he is a soldier in his speech to prove his patriotism for the country.

 

undefined"Inter-Klan Newsletter & Survival Alert (1983)," Collected Materials on White Nationalism, courtesy of Emily Clark, Ph.D, Gonzaga University

This picture collage is from the Aryan Nations Congress in Hayden, Idaho. Many notable figures from the White Supremacist movement attended the convention to spread their messages of hate. At the top far right is Louis Bean, the author of the speech above. 

 

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“Times Special Report” The Seattle Times (Apr1986)

This newspaper from the 1980s displays where the Pacific Northwest hate groups were located at the time. It also showcases an example of a patriotic flyer promoting the Aryan Nations and portraying them as strong white warriors who have fought throughout time for their race. It depicts a modern White Supremacist as a part of the military, a member of Knights Templar from Medieval Times, and a Confederate Soldier.

 

undefined"False Patriots," in Collected Materials on White Nationalism, courtesy of Emily Clark, Ph.D, Gonzaga University

The amount of patriotic White Supremacist groups continued to grow in the 90s. Many members of these groups carried out violent crimes in their states. In Washington state, White Supremacists planned to bomb the federal courthouse in Spokane, there was also a standoff in Whatcom County with the police, and two Supremacists were arrested in Kelso for suspicious activity.

 

 

undefined“Inside a Growing Terrorist Movement” New York (Dec2019/Jan2020)

This photograph is from the 2019 Portland Oregon White Supremacists Rally organized by a violent hate group called the Proud Boys. The American flag was waved proudly by many as they walked down the streets. This is a great modern example of how modern White Supremacists are utilizing patriotism today through the American Flag to disguise their true intentions of hate and bigotry.

 

"Intelligence Project of the Southern Poverty Law Center," in Collected Materials on White Nationalism, courtesy of Emily Clark, Ph.D, Gonzaga University

 

As technology has evolved over time, recruiting tactics used by White Supremacists have followed suit. Many supremacist groups today have moved online to reach a larger audience to recruit. One of the first major online White Nationalist sites, Stormfront, was created in the 90s and has over thirteen million posts as of today.

 


 

This laptop is displaying the type of propaganda that can be found on many White Supremacist websites. Their goal is to make their message as condensed and easy to read as possible, so it can spread quickly through people's social media accounts. Notice how they are attempting to hide their real message of hate behind patriotism.