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The Moose is Loose!: Gonzaga University Honors Program: Lobby Display Case

"The Moose is Loose": Gonzaga University Honors Program

"The Moose is Loose": Gonzaga University Honors Program

Gonzaga University Honors Program, c. 1990

Gonzaga University Honors Program, c. 1990

Honors Program T-shirt, 2014-2015.

Honors Program T-shirt, 2014-2015.

When Fr. Kuder was director of the Honors Program, he possessed a flag that depicted a moose. When house was messy, Fr. Kuder would fly the flag, and the students knew they had 24 hours to clean the house or would he would lock them out of the house for a week. When Fr. Clancy became the director, he decided to discontinue the moose flag because he says he doesn’t “believe in collective guilt.” This same year, he instituted the honors t-shirt, so that everyone in the program would receive a Christmas present. The students who designed that year’s shirt decided to put a moose on t-shirt with the caption “fear the moose,” in reference to Fr. Kuder’s practice of hanging the moose flag. Thereafter the moose became a pseudo-mascot for the program.

Alaska, Colorado, and New Hampshire Moose

Alaska, Colorado, and New Hampshire Moose

Students bring back plush moose from far and wide. The program boasts a large collection of “moose” including multiple Washington, Alaska, and Idaho moose, an Arizona moose (which is actually a scorpion, but who’s judging?), and a New Hampshire moose. During freshman, sophomore, and junior colloquium class discussions, students are only allowed to talk if they are holding the plush moose chosen for that evening’s class. The students pass the moose around as a speaking totem to further discussion in an orderly manner.

Moose Bolo Tie

Moose Bolo Tie

The latest aquisition to the Honors Program's moose collection. This tie was donated by David Kingma, Foley Library Jesuit Archivist. It previously belonged to one of the Jesuits.

Honors Students in College Hall, c. 1960

Honors Students in College Hall, c. 1960

Model of Hopkins House

Model of Hopkins House

This model of the honors house was made by the father of Becky Bland, class of 2006.

The Hopkins House

The honors house provides a place of community. It has been the location of the Honors Program for 25 years. The house is located on campus between the two CCASL houses, thus is a central location for all honors students. It includes a fully stocked kitchen for impromptu community dinners, study rooms, a classroom, a lounging area, and a movie room in the attic. Although no one lives in the house, honors students have 24 hour access for studying or social activities.

Fr. Siconolfi, S. J. with an honors student, c. 1990

Fr. Siconolfi, S. J. with an honors student, c. 1990

Emily Reis, BA English, at Stonehenge, 2013.

Emily Reis, BA English, at Stonehenge, 2013.

Tabitha Lovell, BA Psychology, looking for the Loch Ness Monster in Scotland, 2014. She was unsuccessful.

Tabitha Lovell, BA Psychology, looking for the Loch Ness Monster in Scotland, 2014. She was unsuccessful.

“Salt Weather,” Mary Fontana, BS Honors Biology, class of 2004.

“Salt Weather,” Mary Fontana, BS Honors Biology, class of 2004.

“Arnold Schoenberg’s Philosophical Legacy: How Twelve-Tone Technique Shaped and was Shaped by 20th Century Philosophical Ideology,” Robby Cowan, BA Honors Philosophy and Music, class of 2007.

“Arnold Schoenberg’s Philosophical Legacy: How Twelve-Tone Technique Shaped and was Shaped by 20th Century Philosophical Ideology,” Robby Cowan, BA Honors Philosophy and Music, class of 2007.

“The Story of Illness: An Investigation of the Illness Experience within Narrative Identity and the Consequent Need for Narrative Medicine,” Michelle Brajcich, BS Honors Bio-Chemistry, class of 2014.

“The Story of Illness: An Investigation of the Illness Experience within Narrative Identity and the Consequent Need for Narrative Medicine,” Michelle Brajcich, BS Honors Bio-Chemistry, class of 2014.