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America, Here's My Boy: Gender in American Popular Music during World War I: Case 3

Case 3- Images of the War

Case 3 photo

America entered the war two-and-a-half years after it began. The nations involved had already experience much devastation and death. New technologies such as long range guns and cannons and machine guns produced massive devastation across Europe. The development of trench warfare combined with wet weather meant that soldiers were constantly muddy and cold. The preconceived notion of war as glorious and a means of proving one’s honor led many young men, some in their early teens, to volunteer. The realities of the war were much less romantic than the stories they had heard, however.

Panorama Photo “Montfaucon, showing German observatories & fortifications, captured by the American Forces, Sept. 27, 1917.”

Montfaucon

Spokesman Review, The First World War: Uncensored Pictures, Twelfth Installment, April 22, 1934.

Spokesman Review photo 1

Spokesman Review, photo 2

 

Spokesman Review, The First World War: Uncensored Pictures, Thirteenth Installment, April 29, 1934.

“1914-15…Trench in the East of Nieuport abandoned by the Germans.” Postcard from the studio of Earnest Le Deley. Series 33.

“1914-15…Our Alpine Soldiers at Estaires.” Postcard from the studio of Earnest Le Deley. Series 32.

“1914…Kouskantine Malofeff 15 years old. The youngest Russian volunteer.” Postcard from the studio of Earnest Le Deley. Series 27.

“1914…In Belgium-Ypres- What is left of the little town hall and Beffrey seen from Lille Street.” Postcard from the studio of Earnest Le Deley. Series 24.

“1914…Pieces 155 long in battery.” Postcard from the studio of Earnest Le Deley. Series 12.

Gonzaga University Students Army Training Corps Drill, c. 1918. Postcard.

Many Gonzaga students heard the call to arms. President James Brogan, S.J. and the Department of War established a Students Army Training Corps (SATC) at Gonzaga that began in the fall of 1918. The program allowed students to continue their schooling while preparing themselves for the nation’s service. 350 students joined and received the rank and pay of a private. The program was disbanded in December 1918 after the armistice ended the war.