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Gerard Manley Hopkins: A Life Recollected: GMH Photos & Letters

Case 4: "In more precision now of light and dark"

 Case 4: "In more precision now of light and dark"

Photograph with brothers Arthur and Cyril, c. 1855-56 (BRC 10:1)

Photograph with brothers Arthur and Cyril, c. 1855-56 (BRC 10:1)

 

 

The portrait of the three brothers was painted by Maria Smith Giberne, his mother’s sister, or Maria Rosina de Giberne, sister of George Giberne.

 

Photographic proof of Hopkins, c. 1856 (BRC 10:4)

Photographic proof of Hopkins, c. 1856 (BRC 10:4)

 

 

Watercolor portrait by his aunt, Ann Eleanor Hopkins, 1859 (BRC 12:21)

Watercolor portrait by his aunt, Ann Eleanor Hopkins, 1859 (BRC 12:21)

 

 

 

Ann Hopkins (b. 1815), Manley’s sister, was a skillful visual artist and pianist who encouraged her nephew’s creative talents and intellectual pursuits (including an interest in archaeology).

At Balliol College, Oxford in 1863 (BRC 10:16)

At Balliol College, Oxford in 1863 (BRC 10:16)

 

 

The young men are assembled in front of the doors to the Balliol chapel passage. Hopkins is standing 6th from the left.

 

 

With A. W. Garrett and W. A. Comyn Macfarlane, 27 July 1866 (BRC 10:10)

With A. W. Garrett and W. A. Comyn Macfarlane, 27 July 1866 (BRC 10:10)

During the summer or “long vacation” of 1866, Oxford friends A. W. Garrett, W. A. Comyn Macfarlane, and Hopkins constituted a summer “reading” party at Whiting’s Farm in West Sussex, England.

With colleagues and fellow priests at Clongowes Wood College, c. 1884 (BRC 12:26)

With colleagues and fellow priests at Clongowes Wood College, c. 1884 (BRC 12:26)

 

 

 

Two photographs taken at Clongowes have survived. In this one, Hopkins is seated in the first row, extreme right; the Rector of Clongowes at the time, J. Conmee, S.J., is seated in the front row, center.

Clongowes Wood College, c.1884 (BRC 12:24)

Clongowes Wood College, c.1884 (BRC 12:24)

Hopkins is standing second from left.

 

 

Hopkins’ copy of the Jesuit novices’ schedule, February 1869 (BRC 1:15)

part1/2: Hopkins’ copy of the Jesuit novices’ schedule, February 1869 (BRC 1:15)

 

part 2/2: Hopkins’ copy of the Jesuit novices’ schedule, February 1869 (BRC 1:15)

During the two-year novitiate in Manresa House, Roehampton (a village south-west of London), the young men took turns serving as Beadle or porter, one of whose tasks was to record the daily schedule or “Order of the Day.” Hopkins was Beadle in February 1869.

Hopkins’ letter to Matthew Russell, S.J., 10 October 1886 (BRC 1:2)

part 1/5: Hopkins’ letter to Matthew Russell, S.J., 10 October 1886 (BRC 1:2)

part 2/5: Hopkins’ letter to Matthew Russell, S.J., 10 October 1886 (BRC 1:2)

part 3/5: Hopkins’ letter to Matthew Russell, S.J., 10 October 1886 (BRC 1:2)

part 4/5: Hopkins’ letter to Matthew Russell, S.J., 10 October 1886 (BRC 1:2)

part 5/5: Hopkins’ letter to Matthew Russell, S.J., 10 October 1886 (BRC 1:2)

Russell, for many years the editor of The Irish Monthly, had asked for Hopkins’s opinion of some Latin doggerel poetry; Hopkins replies with “Great haste, as I have an invoice of 331 papers from the R.U.I.” to grade.

Hopkins’ letter to John Henry Cardinal Newman, 20 February 1888 (BRC 1:3)

part 1/4: Hopkins’ letter to John Henry Cardinal Newman, 20 February 1888 (BRC 1:3)

part 2/4: Hopkins’ letter to John Henry Cardinal Newman, 20 February 1888 (BRC 1:3)

part 3/4: Hopkins’ letter to John Henry Cardinal Newman, 20 February 1888 (BRC 1:3)

part 4/4: Hopkins’ letter to John Henry Cardinal Newman, 20 February 1888 (BRC 1:3)

 

 

 

From the late 1860s, Hopkins sent Newman a birthday letter almost every year. In this missive, Hopkins also discusses the state of University College (its forerunner in Dublin was the Catholic University established by Newman in the 1840s). The letter begins: “Your Eminence and dearest Father, Pax Christi I wish you a very happy eighty-eig[h]th birthday and year and as many more as God shall send. It seems that you still enjoy the blessing granted Moses. This poor University College, the somehow-or-other manned wreck of the Catholic University, is afloat and not sinking; rather making a very little way than losing any. There is scarcely any public interest in the University question in this country. Nay, there is none. But this does not prevent good and really patriotic people in a quiet but not ineffective way doing what can be done to advance it.”

Hopkins’ letter to Francis Goldie, S.J., 20 September 1888 (BRC 1:4)

part 1/3: Hopkins’ letter to Francis Goldie, S.J., 20 September 1888 (BRC 1:4)

part 2/3: Hopkins’ letter to Francis Goldie, S.J., 20 September 1888 (BRC 1:4)

part 3/3: Hopkins’ letter to Francis Goldie, S.J., 20 September 1888 (BRC 1:4)

 

 

 

The request from Goldie, who had spent time in the Balearics (i.e. Mallorca, Minorca, Ibiza, and Formentera in the Mediterranean off the east coast of Spain) gathering material for his Life of St. Alphonsus Rodriguez (1889), is the stimulus for Hopkins’s poem on that saint, who had been canonized on 06.09.1887.

Hopkins’ letter to Francis MacCabe, 27 February 1888 (BRC 1:5)

part 1/2: Hopkins’ letter to Francis MacCabe, 27 February 1888 (BRC 1:5)

part 2/3: Hopkins’ letter to Francis MacCabe, 27 February 1888 (BRC 1:5)

The MacCabe family lived in Donnybrook village, south of Dublin. Dr MacCabe (later, Sir Francis), the medical director of Dundrum Criminal asylum, and his wife first met Hopkins while he was teaching at Stonyhurst, where their son was a pupil. When Hopkins moved to Dublin, they befriended him.