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Tradition and Transformation: 125 Years in 125 Items: Extras

Extras

undefinedThis section of the exhibit is mostly a collection of photographs showing Gonzaga’s rich history.  There are a couple of realia items that were too big to fit in the cases in the physical exhibit.  The items are listed mostly chronologically.

Item 95: Campus, 1892

Item 95: Campus, 1892

Recreation Hall, Original College Building, St. Aloysius Church

In 1892 a two-story framed hall designed to serve as a recreation center on the main floor and a dormitory upstairs was built.  A framed St. Aloysius church was also finished and dedicated that year.

Item 96: “Gonzaga Foot Ball Eleven: Champions of Spokane,” Football Team, 1896


Item 96: “Gonzaga Foot Ball Eleven: Champions of Spokane,” Football Team, 1896

1896 Team coached by Henry Luhn (back row, middle), who had played at Notre Dame

Item 97: Administration Building (now College Hall) Construction, 1897

Item 97: Administration Building (now College Hall) Construction, 1897

By the mid 1890s Gonzaga needed another building to accommodate the growing number of students.  A contract was signed with Henry Preusse and Julius Zittel architects for a new $100,000 building.  Construction started in 1897.  After the large blocks of granite were placed as the foundation, over 1,000,000 common bricks and 200,000 pressed brick for faceting were used.  When the pile was partly assembled a photograph was taken.  By the end of 1898, the walls and roof were completed.  It took almost two years to complete this new building.  Located 300 feet east of the original college and occupying two city blocks, it was the largest building in Spokane. 

Item 98: Moving Original College Building, 1900

Item 98: Moving Original College Building, 1900

In the spring of 1900, the arduous task of moving the original college building closer to the Administration Building began.  The building was calculated to weigh about 2,500,000 pounds.  An immense framework of wood was built under the entire structure before the building was raised.  After a few months the building was ready to be moved.  Due to the sheer weight, changes were made to how to move it using six to eight horses with a windlass. Hydraulic jacks were used for pushing the building.  After the move, the building housed the Northwest Jesuits’ Scholasticate.

Item 99: Freshmen Basketball Team, 1907 - 1908

Item 99: Freshmen Basketball Team, 1907 - 1908

100. Gonzaga Silver Jubilee A Memoir, by Fr. George Weibel, SJ, 1912

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Book published in 1912 to commemorate Gonzaga’s 25th anniversary and written by Fr. George Weibel SJ. and Gonzaga students.

Item 101: Gonzaga Silver Jubilee Artwork, 1912

Item 101: Gonzaga Silver Jubilee Artwork, 1912

Artwork used for the book:  Gonzaga Silver Jubilee: A Memoir (See Item 100).  The artwork shows the work of the Jesuits in the area, first with the Native Americans, then Gonzaga College in 1887, and later Gonzaga University in 1912.

Item 102: Baseball Team, 1912

Item 102: Baseball Team, 1912

1912 Baseball Team behind Administration Building

Gonzaga College's first documented baseball game occurred on June 21, 1890.  The teams at first played other Spokane area teams such as the Spokane Amateur Athletic Club, the Elks, Fort Wright, Blair Business College, and the Spokane Indians.  Later, Gonzaga’s varsity teams’ opponents would be a mix of local and collegiate teams.  Eventually, Gonzaga would play only collegiate level teams.  Through the years baseball provided a wonderful recreational outlet for Gonzaga student be it competing on a varsity team or on an intramural team. 

Item 103: First Class of Law Graduates, 1915

Item 103: First Class of Law Graduates, 1915

During Gonzaga’s Jubilee year in 1911 – 1912, Gonzaga College changed its name to Gonzaga University with the start of its School of Law in the fall of 1912.  A three year law course was offered in the evening, five nights a week with two instructors.  Saturdays were for debates and special assignments.  Thirty students were admitted that first term.  On June 10, 1915 the first group of 13 law students graduated.

Item 104: Students Army Training Corp, 1918

Item 104: Students Army Training Corp, 1918

Students Army Training Corp stand behind the Administration Building, 1918

When World War I broke out, students wanted to enlist and join the war effort thus leaving Gonzaga.  GU President James Brogan, SJ looked for ways to keep them on campus.  He persuaded officers at Fort Wright to provide drill instructors.  Gonzaga negotiated with the War Department to establish a Students Army Training Corp (SATC).  This program would keep students on campus and offer them a definite military status. 

By September 1918, the SATC was formally established.  Rifles, uniforms, and other equipment were sent.  The students received the rank and pay of a private of $30.  Approximately 350 students over18 years joined.  Captain Theophilus Steele was appointed commanding officer of the program.  After the armistice was signed, the SATC disbanded in December 1918.

Item 105: Aerial View of Campus with Football Stadium, 1920s

Item 105: Aerial View of Campus with Football Stadium, 1920s

Aerial view of campus during the 1920s showing the football stadium to the east.  To the south was McGoldrick’s Lumber Company with its mill pond.  To the north of the stadium past DeSmet Hall was Webster Grade School that later became Gonzaga High School and then Gonzaga’s Law School. 

Item 106: Knights of the Kennel, 1935 - 1936

Item 106: Knights of the Kennel, 1935 - 1936

The Knights of the Kennel, ancestors to today’s Knights, originated in September 1924.  Their purpose was to take over the obligations of the former G-Club.  These included keeping order and ushering at all athletic events, greeting visiting teams, and provide them hospitality.  The group was limited to freshmen and sophomores.

Item 107: Yell Leaders, 1936 – 1937

Item 107: Yell Leaders, 1936 – 1937

 

The Gonzaga University Yell Leaders are (left to right) Willard Roe, Bob Jones, and Frank Falk.  They pose in the Gonzaga University football stadium. 

Item 108: Hockey Team, 1939

Item 108: Hockey Team, 1939

Gonzaga played its first hockey game in January 1931.  They lost 1 to 0 to the Adnacs a team with experienced players, after two five minute overtimes. In 1939 they won the Pacific Coast Amateur Championship by defeating University of California 3 to 0.

Hockey was dropped as an intercollegiate sport in 1940 for financial reasons.  It had shown a financial loss in the previous three years.  Also the school’s competition in the non-collegiate West Kootenay-American league was frowned upon by the Pacific Coast conference. Coach Denny Edge would continue to keep the team as an independent commercially sponsored entry.  Hockey continues today as a club sport.

Item 109: Glee Club, 1939 - 1940

Item 109: Glee Club, 1939 - 1940

In 1928, Lyle Moore was hired to direct the Men’s Glee Club, which gave its first performance in April 1930.  The club was well received in Spokane and in 1932 the club began to tour the Pacific Coast.  A highlight happened in 1949, when it performed with Bing Crosby on radio.  For 30 years the Men’s Glee Club flourished under his baton.  By 1958 GU administrators decided to curtail its activities so that club members could spend more time on their academic endeavors instead of extracurricular activities.

Item 111: V-12 Program, 1944 – 1945

Item 111: V-12 Program, 1944 – 1945

Item 112: Mendel Club Members at the Mendel Society Musicale, 1948

Item 112: Mendel Club Members at the Mendel Society Musicale, 1948

Members from the Mendel Society perform the “can can” at the Mendel Society Musicale

The Mendel Society was an academic honorary group formed to foster interest and research in the biological sciences.

Item 113. Harvest Ball, 1949

Item 113. Harvest Ball, 1949

The Harvest Ball was held annually in the fall.  Students were required to wear Harvest Ball costumes which included plaid shirt, jeans, and loafers. 

Item 114: Women in the Classroom, about 1949

Item 114: Women in the Classroom, about 1949

In the fall of 1948, Gonzaga enrolled female students for the first time in 61 years.  Previously, women had attended its professional schools such as law, education, nursing, and others, but now they could attend undergraduate courses.  With seventy-five women registered in the fall of 1948, the female coeds (outnumbered 29 to 1) entered a somewhat hostile environment.  The decision to permit women was met with some opposition by the Gonzaga community.

Item 115: National Collegiate Boxing Champions: Coach Joey August, Jim Reilly, Carl Maxey, and Eli Thomas with mascot, 1950

Item 115: National Collegiate Boxing Champions: Coach Joey August, Jim Reilly, Carl Maxey, and Eli Thomas with mascot, 1950

In spring 1950, Gonzaga was co-champions of the National Collegiate Boxing Tournament.  Coached by Joey August, Carl Maxey was the 175-pound champion; Eli Thomas was the top middleweight champion; and Jim Reilly added team points in the semifinals.  Citing eligibility changes by the Pacific Coast Conference and a short schedule forced the administration to discontinue boxing in 1952.

Item 116: Women’s Rifle Team, 1953

Item 116: Women’s Rifle Team, 1953

Started in 1952 - 1953 school year, the women’s rifle team was formed under Captain Lex Byers and competed in several competitions in the Inland Empire although their record was not impressive.  It appears that this rifle team was short lived.  There was a shooting range in the upper gymnasium, now Magnuson Theater.  \

Item 117: “Westward Ho”, Synchronized Swim Show, 1968

Item 117: “Westward Ho”, Synchronized Swim Show, 1968

The “Aquamaids” stand on the diving board in Kennedy Pavilion

With the addition of a swimming pool on campus with the opening of the Kennedy Pavilion in 1965, Gonzaga offered swimming as a physical activity and sport.  Previously, swim classes were taught off campus.  Professor Marjorie Anderson oversaw the “Naiads,” a synchronized swim team.  These “aquamaids” offered a show during the1968 Parents’ Weekend.

Item 118: KZAG Radio Disc Jockeys, 1974

Item 118: KZAG Radio Disc Jockeys, 1974

KZAG disc jockeys

Starting in the late 1960s and into the 1980s, Gonzaga’s radio station was run by the students as disc jockeys.

Item 119: “M-G-M Special Disc Jockey Record”, KZAG 33 1/3 Record, March 11, 1970

Item 119: “M-G-M Special Disc Jockey Record”, KZAG 33 1/3 Record, March 11, 1970

Record used on Gonzaga student radio station KZAG for March 11, 1970

Item 120: “Spike” Costume, about 1987

Item 120: “Spike” Costume, about 1987

Spike shoots a basket in Martin Centre

In the early years, Gonzaga’s athletic teams were called the “Blue and the Whites.”  Then in 1921 the school adopted the name “Bulldogs” after the football team playing tenaciously like bulldogs. After a vote by the student body that description became the new mascot.  They got their first bulldog immediately.  Over the years, Gonzaga has had numerous live bulldogs as mascots such as Gunner, Salty and Chesty.  These dogs were replaced in the 1982 by a human wearing a cape as Captain Zag. 

In 1987 GU student Lee Mauney was the first costumed Spike.  As a cheerleader Spike is able to continue the bulldog tradition while creating more enthusiasm from the fans. A person wearing a costume is more animated, entertaining, and appealing.  Children easily recognize him and are eager to give him a high five.  Spike is used as a public relations tool, as he also attends events on behalf of the university.  Today’s Spike is a much different mascot than the first live bulldog of 1921.  Yet, these mascots served to symbolize the characteristics of Gonzaga University and provide school and community spirit.

Item 121: Gonzaga Men’s and Women’s Crew, 1986-1987

Item 121: Gonzaga Men’s and Women’s Crew, 1986-1987

Men’s and women’s crew teams with Coach Fr. Michael Sicconolfi, SJ. 

Gonzaga began competing for the first time in rowing as an intercollegiate sport in 1990. Previously, Fr. Mike Siconolfi got crew started in 1983, when it was only a club sport. Excellent skills, coaching, and financial support from Claire and Bob McDonald led to Gonzaga’s success in the sport. Today, both the men’s and women’s crew teams compete nationally.

Item 122: Volleyball Team, 1990 – 1991

Item 122: Volleyball Team, 1990 – 1991

Item 123: Tent City for Men’s Basketball Game against University of Washington, 2006

Item 123: Tent City for Men’s Basketball Game against University of Washington, 2006

Students camped out for days prior to the game against rival University of Washington on December 9, 2006.  GU was ranked 18th and UW was ranked 13th.  Gonzaga won 97 to 77.

For major home games, students campout to get to the best seats in McCarthey Arena.  At first students would show up days before the game.  Now it is more regulated such as no more than 7 people in a tent; someone has to be in the tent at all times; Kennel Club board will perform random ID checks.  To get a tent number, a location is sent out to ticket holders via a Tweet, and they race to sign up.  Then they pitch their tents according to their number.

Item 124: Framed Campus Print, no date.

Item 124: Framed Campus Print, no date.

Signed print of an oil painting by Carl Funseth showing the front of the Administration Building and St. Aloysius Church with traffic on Boone Ave around the 1920s.

On loan from Fr. Bernard Coughlin, SJ.

Item 125: Maui Invitational Surfboard, 2009

Item 125: Maui Invitational Surfboard, 2009

Gonzaga Men’s Basketball Team received this surfboard after competing in the Maui Invitational Tournament sponsored by EA Sports in 2009.  The 8 foot surfboard is shaped by Jeff Timpone of Maui and has his signature on back.  Gonzaga’s bulldog logo is on the front.  This was the second time that Gonzaga has participated in this tournament.  They will be returning to this tournament in a few more years.

On loan from GU Athletics

Exhibition Info

Exhibition is now closed.

 

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